New 2016 ALTA/NSPS Standards Effective TODAY

2016 ALTA/NSPS Standards Approved

Are you working on an ALTA/NSPS Land Title Survey today? If so, you might want to be aware that the approved Standards have been updated and officially take effect today, February 23, 2016.

For your convenience, the full document has been embedded into this article, along with a download link.Scroll to the bottom of the text to see it.

Apparently, the intent of the new Standards are to clarify some items which might cause questions between surveyors, lenders, title companies, and clients. Here’s a brief summary of what has been changed:

  • Surveyors won’t be required to show rights-of-way or easements if the documents are not legible.
  • A clarification has been made regarding the obligation of the surveyor to include recorded documents that are provided to him/her by the title company and/or client.
  • There have also been some changes made to Table A:
    • Item 6a is now more inclusive than 6b.
    • Also in regards to Item 6, zoning information will only be shown if provided in a report from the client.
    • Items 11a and 11b have been combined into a single Item 11.
    • Item 11 no longer includes the requirement to show railroad tracks, spurs and sidings.
    • Item 13 now refers specifically to “tax records” (instead of the broader term, “public records”) when displaying adjoiner owner information.
    • Item 18 removes the requirement to show evidence of a solid waste dump, sanitary landfill, or sump.
    • Item 19 requirement to show wetlands has been movedto Item 18.
    • Items 20a and 20b have been combined into the new Item 19.

There may be other changes, but these are likely the most pertinent. Your best bet is to simply review the updated Standards yourself.

2016 ALTA/NSPS Standards APPROVED

Wendell

Wendell

Wendell was a Land Surveyor for 26 years, then moved on to building websites for his second career. But he never lost sight of the surveying community and the other disciplines related to surveying. He's purposely stayed involved in the surveying industry because he has always been — and will continue to be — a Land Surveyor at heart.

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