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old railroad spike?

Discussion in 'Surveying & Geomatics' started by DavidALee, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. DavidALee

    DavidALee 4-Year Member

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    I finished a survey on some family property this weekend. The property borders on an abandoned stretch of railroad. The railroad was ripped out many years ago and it is just a dirt road now.

    As I was looking for a corner, I came across an old railroad spike (pictured below). I've never seen one that looked like this. Does anyone know what time period this type of spike was used? I haven't found anything on it on the internet so far.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Andy Nold

    Andy Nold 6-Year Member

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    Rail anchor
     
  3. Holy Cow

    Holy Cow 6-Year Member

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    As Andy said, that is not a spike.

    http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images?_adv_prop=image&va=rail+anchor

    The J-shaped ones are more common around here.
     
  4. J. Penry

    J. Penry 6-Year Member

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    Rail anchor is correct. These are placed alongside the ties with one end anchored to the bottom of the rail to keep the ties from moving out of position.
     
  5. paden cash

    paden cash 6-Year Member

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  6. Bob Port

    Bob Port 4-Year Member

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    not sure if anchor or not

    my old boss used to call those anti-creepers
     
  7. Jim Frame

    Jim Frame 6-Year Member

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    > Rail anchor is correct. These are placed alongside the ties with one end anchored to the bottom of the rail to keep the ties from moving out of position.

    From Army Field Manual 55-7:

    7-14. Rail anchors are installed on the rail base securely against the side of the tie. Anchors are designed to resist or check the longitudinal movement of the rails under traffic. They also maintain proper expansion and contraction forces that build up in continuous welded rail (Figure 7-2). Without anchorage, the rail will run irregularly.

    It sounds to me like the anchors use the ties to constrain the rail, rather than the other way around.
     
  8. Mark Mayer

    Mark Mayer 6-Year Member

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    > not sure if anchor or not
    >
    > my old boss used to call those anti-creepers
    Rail Anchors, "designed to eliminate creepage of track"
     
  9. J. Penry

    J. Penry 6-Year Member

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  10. DavidALee

    DavidALee 4-Year Member

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    That's why I couldn't find anything on it. :) Thanks guys.
     
  11. Andy Nold

    Andy Nold 6-Year Member

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    Exactly. They keep the rail from moving or "creeping" longitudinally.
     
  12. J. Penry

    J. Penry 6-Year Member

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    Nice. I learned something new. I always thought they were to keep the ties in place or perpendicular to the rails.
     
  13. Paul in PA

    Paul in PA 6-Year Member

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    Very Difficult To Drive Into Asphalt

    ;)

    Paul in PA
     
  14. DavidALee

    DavidALee 4-Year Member

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    Very Difficult To Drive Into Asphalt

    Yeah I thought about that. You would think that growing up along the railroad tracks in southern WV I would have paid attention to something like that, but no.
     

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