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Which survey marker takes precedence?  

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bigtrees
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A piece of property was originally surveyed in 1872 as part of the government land office / PLSS program. A 40 acre tract (government lot #4) was identified on the GLO survey. The section corner was set. Dots are visible on the GLO survey showing some subdivided parcels within the section containing the subject property.

A 1972 survey shows the section corner at the northwest corner of the property (6" concrete monument). It also shows a 6" concrete monument at the southwest corner of the subject property. The surveyor put a note stating that the concrete monument was at the incorrect location and the surveyor set a new post 60" east in what he calls the correct location.

I have located the 6" concrete monument that the 1972 survey says in the wrong location. I have not located the steel post that he said was in the right location.

Which post sets the corner of the property? The 6" concrete monument that the 1972 survey says is in the wrong location or the not-yet-located steel pipe that he claimed to be the correct position?

The 6" concrete monument has no identifying markings on it.

 

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Daniel Ralph
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This sounds like a test question albeit poorly crafted, and I am not going to get sucked into it except to say there is not enough information given, and what kind of surveyor uses inches in that type of situation.  

 

 

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Tim V. PLS
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More information needed but my 1st question is: Which one more closely matches the GLO survey?

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bigtrees
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Posted by: Tim V. PLS

More information needed but my 1st question is: Which one more closely matches the GLO survey?

For the purpose of this thread, let's say that the not-yet-located 1972 steel post matches the GLO survey data. I haven't field checked to be sure, but am assuming the 1972 survey was done accurately.

I'm just not sure what to think about the 6" concrete corner. Clearly it was put in that spot for a reason and someone at some point, over 50 years ago, thought that it seemed like a nice location.

In the years since, it appears that the landowners have accepted the concrete corner as the property corner location, as a logging road was built on top of (i.e., not next to) where the not-yet-located steel post was set. The neighboring property owner is the state.

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bigtrees
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No, it's not a test question. It's real life. I can provide a screenshot of the 1972 survey where the surveyor found the concrete monument and noted that it was incorrect, and showed that he set the post in the correct location at 5.4 (caught me there) feet away.

I agree there isn't enough information, but I don't know where to go to get the extra info that would make this simple. The only place that might shed light is the 1872 survey's field notes but they aren't readily legible.

Please share what you do know.

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Scott Ellis
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Posted by: Daniel Ralph

This sounds like a test question albeit poorly crafted, and I am not going to get sucked into it except to say there is not enough information given, and what kind of surveyor uses inches in that type of situation.  

 

 

I use inches for property corners, Culverts, Fence Post. A 6" concrete monument sounds better than a  half foot diameter or a fourth of foot radius concrete monument. 

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