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Where on a fence do you measure?  

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Bill93
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It's been a while since I've seen this discussed.

Suppose a client asks you to cut out a few acres from a larger parcel, in an approximate rectangle, "where it is fenced. " Assume the jurisdiction requires a plat with measurements to tagged monuments.

How do you monument/tag it and what point on a fence do you measure to, the center of the corner post, the tangent point of a wire, the PI of the wires, or what?

Next question: how much departure from a straight line do you allow before adding points of inflection to the plat?

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Bill C
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@bill93 you probably already know this, but Mulford's "Boundaries and Landmarks" discussed some of these details, at least as far as conventions and traditions went in the eastern US in 1912.

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linebender
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Next question: how much departure from a straight line do you allow before adding points of inflection to the plat of a government line that is supposed to be straight? 

The plaintiff owned the W 1/2 before and after the judge ruled. 

Sec15

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linebender
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If "where it is fenced. " is the intent of the conveyance the fence is the monument regardless of how many inflections are present on the plat or how many other monuments are placed or how far off a monument line the fence departs.  What parts or pieces of the fence is the boundary is irrelevant. The entire fence with all its parts and pieces is the boundary.  It is the surveyor's duty to make the intent clear not necessarily by the number of irons set but by the language used in the description and on the plat. 

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Duane Frymire
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Places not on an exterior boundary, I have the client place the mark and then I put in the real one and shoot it.  If that's not possible, I locate the fence and have them put marks on the paper where they want them.  It's all about carrying out the intentions of the parties, basically writing a contract for them. We do some of our contract language writing on the ground.

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Paul in PA
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The Good Face. Typically a fence has a good side, (chain link side or board side) with posts all on the other side. Were I surveying existing lots I might measure to the side nearest the lot line, to make it clear who owns the fence. It is necessary to determine the owner's intent, is the fence to be a part of the new or remainder parcel and I would strike a straight line as much as possible to do that. If the owner intends the exact fence to be the new boundary line I would explain the additional cost to do just that.

One might assume "where it is fenced"  means the entirety of the fenced in area is to be on the new lot but not necessarily the entirety of the new lot and would be less concerned if the good side was not regular.

I would set permanent monuments and possibly tie to fence corner posts but not rely on them.

Paul in PA

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Norman Oklahoma
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I'm going to fake it a little to make sure my corner rods don't fall inside a fence post or even on the concrete base, if there is one. Mulford notwithstanding, It's going to be a situation by situation call.

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Skeeter1996
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My rule is: If the fence lines on the clients side of the property line it's his fence.

If it lies on the neighbor's side of the property line it's his fence.

If it lies on the property line it's "our" fence.

Of course I measure to the centerline of the fence to see where it lies in relationship to the property line.

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Dave Karoly
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A fence has a functional precision of 6 inches at best.

Like Norman says, set the rod as close as you can then run the boundary to it.

I followed a Survey, there were rod/cap and fence corner posts.  The fence corner  posts fit the bearings and distances very close, the rods were driven some distance away (a foot plus).  I didn't like that solution very much.  The map said nothing about it, just set rod/cap with an arrow to the corner point.  Actually I've seen this a couple of times.  At least say "set rod/cap S 45°15' E 1.25' from corner which is occupied by a fence post."

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aliquot
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I would try to ensure the fence is all on one side of the line, and create a boundary as straight as possible that stays within an agreed distance of the fence, unless your clients insist they want to share it. If they insist on sharing it, I would measure to the center of the the corner post, and bury RMs (one on each side) at every corner.

For the minor deflections I would again shoot the center of the post. Hopefully your regulations will allow you to just call out the post, or at least accept a post with a  washer with your number.

The goal is to ensure your client understands and agrees with the uncertainty of the fence location, and the fact that the fence position is not stable over a long time  period. Of course the closer to the actual fence the boundary is the more expensive it will be. 

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