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cole
Posts: 18
 cole
Member
(@cole)
5+ posts
Joined: 3 months ago

in my 1st job, we set up a base stations, then used rovers that recieved signal from the base station radio antenna. the job im in now, we use just the rover, hotspot to an internet device, which connects to the base network (presumably the closest base)

my question: does this VRS network decrease accuracy or at the very least, consistency? the reason i ask is bc i remember setting control via the base/rover and being able to then use conventional instruments on those points with 5 hun or less for my deltas. now, with this internet connected rover (vrs) sometimes im 2 tenths off from two points set with the rover when i check with the TS. ive noticed its much more inconsistent, to the point i cant setup jobs anymore with GPS i have to use the TS. anyone have opinions on the VRS???

8 Replies
gschrock
Posts: 3171
Member
(@gschrock)
2,500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Over very short baselines, like a base and rover on a job site it is hard to beat, say less than a km. But beyond that they can often be on par until the baseline  starts getting longer. Single base degrades over distance, and can vary a lot form one day to another, even more so if you start getting over 8km or more from a base. A network solution does a lot of modelling and can keep things pretty consistent out to 70km and sometimes more, can deal with tide loading on the coast, ride out bad space weather  better, etc... But if all of your work is going to be very local, and you don't mind setting up a base, babysitting it, dealing with the geodesy, and possibly getting it stolen, then single base is hard to beat. Different value propositions. Some folks like being able to get out of the rig an off they go without worrying about any of that and instantly tied to the NSRS. There can be strong views either way, but I am sure that if networks sucked as bad as some folks say then they would not be so widespread and so broadly used.  Quite a few firms buy a base and rover and use them both as network rovers except for occasions where there is no cell, or if they need to do some really short baseline work as a base and rover. There are a lot of things that neither are well suited for. But the only way to tell for sure if it fits your own value proposition is to try it out and compare directly. 

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Just A. Surveyor
Posts: 1632
Member
(@just-a-surveyor)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 2 years ago

Been using a VRS network for a couple of years now and about 2 months ago I got a base for added capabilities.

I have had fairly decent results with the VRS and have never seen the 2 tenths you are seeing.

Change your mount point so that it connexts to the nearest base and see if that helps.

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Just A. Surveyor
Posts: 1632
Member
(@just-a-surveyor)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 2 years ago

Been using a VRS network for a couple of years now and about 2 months ago I got a base for added capabilities.

I have had fairly decent results with the VRS and have never seen the 2 tenths you are seeing.

Change your mount point so that it connexts to the nearest base and see if that helps.

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Lookinatchya
Posts: 113
Member
(@lookinatchya)
100+ posts
Joined: 6 years ago

I've been using a network rover and VRS network for the past 5 years. I can say I have had excellent results. My distance checks with the TS have been within hundredths, rarely over a tenth. I have checked into published bench marks, always less than a tenth, usually .03 to .07.  I have checked into work I did up to 10 years age with a base and rover set up. Same accuracies there. I have done site calibrations on jobs done with TS and tied several larger jobs together using the network rover. I can say I am very pleased with the results.

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