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Stone Monument  

Jim Frame
(@jim-frame)
5,000+ posts Registered

Stone monuments are pretty unusual in my area; I think I've only seen two of them in Yolo County before today. This section corner monument is shown on several maps, one as recent as 2010, so digging it up wasn't exactly a newsworthy event. However, it was definitely worth a photo:

I drove a quartet of 8" spikes around it to make it easier for the next guy to find.

Jim Frame
Frame Surveying & Mapping
609 A Street
Davis, CA 95616

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Posted : May 18, 2017 4:07 pm
Jim Frame
(@jim-frame)
5,000+ posts Registered

Edit: It's a 1/4 corner, not a section corner.

Jim Frame
Frame Surveying & Mapping
609 A Street
Davis, CA 95616

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Posted : May 18, 2017 5:36 pm
John Evers
(@john-evers)
100+ posts Registered

Jim,

That looks a lot like a stone in Ohio, except for the spray paint.

How do we know it is a stone and not a rock...the graffiti!

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Posted : May 18, 2017 7:03 pm
sjc1989
(@sjc1989)
250+ posts Registered

John Evers, post: 429024, member: 467 wrote: How do we know it is a stone and not a rock...the graffiti!

My favorite answer to a client when they ask that question is: "Because I found it right where it should be." We have a great deal of stones set by county surveyors to perpetuate stakes/mounds as well as early section breakdowns. Only about half the time do I find a description of the stone in my research, and it's rare (1/50) to find any original markings on the stone like a chiseled 'X'.

Steve

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Posted : May 19, 2017 8:35 am
Dave Karoly
(@dave-karoly)
5,000+ posts Registered

I was at one this week that the 1998 RS said found original GLO stone, replaced with pipe/cap. I looked in the mound but didn't see any large enough. I didn't look very hard, though because it was a quick run through the forest identifying as many monuments as possible. This is in the mountains east of Porterville, a little known grove of huge Sequoia trees. The other mixed conifers are pretty much ravaged especially the pines, firs are faring better.

I thought it my duty to exhibit things as they are, not as they ought to be. -Alexander Hamilton, August 13, 1782

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Posted : May 19, 2017 8:41 am
Dave Karoly
(@dave-karoly)
5,000+ posts Registered

Mostly the GLO didn't use the Sequoias for BTs, I guess for a few reasons, they were the marketable timber so you don't want BTs that will soon disappear and the bark is very thick. We saw one healed face but it wouldn't be politic to open it. One of the Firs is open complete with scribing in excellent condition.

I thought it my duty to exhibit things as they are, not as they ought to be. -Alexander Hamilton, August 13, 1782

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Posted : May 19, 2017 8:44 am
Jp7191
(@jp7191)
500+ posts Registered

Dave Karoly, post: 429101, member: 94 wrote: Mostly the GLO didn't use the Sequoias for BTs, I guess for a few reasons, they were the marketable timber so you don't want BTs that will soon disappear and the bark is very thick. We saw one healed face but it wouldn't be politic to open it. One of the Firs is open complete with scribing in excellent condition.

Is it politic to survey anymore? Dig alert, right of entry laws, tree huggers.... I can not imagine following the manual and scribing trees to perpetuate a corner anymore. We were taught to leave evidence and now I try and not leave any evidence that I was ever there. Crazy times, no country for old men, Jp

“He doesn’t do a lot of work around here. He shows zero initiative. He’s not a team player. He never wants to go that extra mile. Tom is exactly what I’m looking for in a government employee.” Ron Swason about employee Tom, Parks & Rec tv show

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Posted : May 19, 2017 10:42 am
Dave Karoly
(@dave-karoly)
5,000+ posts Registered

Jp7191, post: 429127, member: 1617 wrote: Is it politic to survey anymore? Dig alert, right of entry laws, tree huggers.... I can not imagine following the manual and scribing trees to perpetuate a corner anymore. We were taught to leave evidence and now I try and not leave any evidence that I was ever there. Crazy times, no country for old men, Jp

The monument is existent so, no, I'm not going to open a 2000 year old tree, it's not necessary.

I thought it my duty to exhibit things as they are, not as they ought to be. -Alexander Hamilton, August 13, 1782

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Posted : May 19, 2017 11:34 am
Jp7191
(@jp7191)
500+ posts Registered

Dave Karoly, post: 429132, member: 94 wrote: The monument is existent so, no, I'm not going to open a 2000 year old tree, it's not necessary.

I don't disagree, but I find you can not hardly break a branch while surveying anymore without someone having a problem. Jp

“He doesn’t do a lot of work around here. He shows zero initiative. He’s not a team player. He never wants to go that extra mile. Tom is exactly what I’m looking for in a government employee.” Ron Swason about employee Tom, Parks & Rec tv show

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Posted : May 19, 2017 2:47 pm
Gene Kooper
(@gene-kooper)
500+ posts Registered

Nice stone, Jim. I must ask why some of our peers instinctively act like mongrel curs and mark whatever they find with pee paint?

Sigh!

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Posted : May 19, 2017 3:45 pm
Jim Frame
(@jim-frame)
5,000+ posts Registered

The paint thing is common around here, especially for buried monuments of any kind. We have lots of pavement -- and hardpan soil that might as well be pavement -- and it's reassuring to catch a flash of day-glo orange when chipping through that stuff, so I'm not complaining.

Jim Frame
Frame Surveying & Mapping
609 A Street
Davis, CA 95616

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Posted : May 19, 2017 9:32 pm
Jpaws
(@jpaws)
FNG Registered

Nice find! How many holes did you dig!

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Posted : May 21, 2017 12:23 pm
Gene Kooper
(@gene-kooper)
500+ posts Registered

Jim Frame, post: 429197, member: 10 wrote: We have lots of pavement -- and hardpan soil that might as well be pavement

Caliche is nature's pavement.

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Posted : May 21, 2017 1:30 pm
Richard
(@richard)
1,000+ posts Registered

Your stones are fascinating. Pity early surveyors here didn't make more use of such.
On other hand timber was so plentiful, as were stones.
Perhaps they thought stones would look too much part of the landscape. Plus being predominantly basalt or dolerite not very easy to mark.

Jim Frame, post: 429197, member: 10 wrote: -- and it's reassuring to catch a flash of day-glo orange when chipping through that stuff

When I bury or refind an old buried mark I place about 1.5 metres flagging tape over it and cover over.
Spikes etc I can tie to get a length wrapped around its neck.
The tape appears long before one gets to the mark.

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Posted : May 21, 2017 1:44 pm
Jim Frame
(@jim-frame)
5,000+ posts Registered

Jpaws, post: 429346, member: 12545 wrote: Nice find! How many holes did you dig!

Two - one during an optimistic effort to eyeball the intersection of a projected road centerline and a tape pull off an old fence post, the other after calculating a position from some other recovered monuments. I was only off about a foot and a half with the first hole start, but it quickly became apparent that blind digging wasn't a good use of my time in this case.

Jim Frame
Frame Surveying & Mapping
609 A Street
Davis, CA 95616

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Posted : May 21, 2017 3:36 pm
  
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