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RADAR
Posts: 4553
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(@dougie)
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Me: Hello, this is Doug

Him: Hi, how much is it to survey just one side of my property?

Me: Well, it usually takes as much time to survey just one side as it does to survey the whole thing, but I can take a look at it for you. what's the address?

I look it up on the county GIS:

1425

Me: It looks like you might be accessing your backyard through 2 of your neighbors properties, do you have an easement?

Him: No, but it's no big deal; that's not the side I want surveyed anyway. I just want the east side, in the back surveyed; how much is that?

Me: Well, like I said, I'd have to do a thorough survey and if you are accessing your property through your neighbors property; I'd have to show that on my survey.

Him: Never mind then...Click

 

Has anyone else ever been asked to withhold information from a survey? Would you do something like that?

 

Dougie

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One cup o joe
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(@one-cup-o-joe)
Joined: 2 years ago

50+ posts
Posts: 55

I have been asked this before. I send them on down the line!

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(@ken-salzmann)
Joined: 9 years ago

500+ posts
Posts: 514

I would be OK with just a partial survey as the others have said.  I would also be sure the proposal the client would sign before I started work very clearly explained what I would, and would not include on the survey he was requesting.  No surprises after the partial survey is delivered.

Ken

 

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aliquot
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(@aliquot)
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Probably not a client you want to be working for, but sometimes it is actually possible  to survey "just one side". I don't see a problem with producing a survey of just one side in cases where a complete survey isn't required to be confident in that side. as long as the survey clearly only shows one side as surveyed. 

Some have claimed that their state standards don't allow this. If that was the case, then of course I would refuse to do it. 

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Norman Oklahoma
Posts: 4425
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(@norman-oklahoma)
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Joined: 4 years ago

Last year a regular commercial client asked me to survey, very specifically,  the top of a stacked block retaining wall along a right of way on a house renovation.  These types of wall step back with each successive course. I tied the top and the bottom, and showed both on my sketch which I provided to the client. The top of the wall was clear of the right of way line, the bottom was not. 

A couple weeks later I got a call from a city inspector asking why I hadn't shown the bottom. Oh, but I did, says I.   It seems that the client had whited out the calls to the bottom of the wall.  I provided the inspector with my version and life goes on. When confronted with that Whitey said he didn't think it was a big deal. Live and learn.  

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A Harris
Posts: 7963
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(@a-harris)
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Joined: 9 years ago

I was recently ask to remove the water line of a lake on his property.

It had nothing to do with the boundaries or location of monuments.

Off it came...........

Was recently ask to change the last name of a woman who had divorced since the date of the survey.

Could not comply with her request because that was her name at the time of my survey.

so, it depends upon the circumstance.

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Norman Oklahoma
Posts: 4425
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(@norman-oklahoma)
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Joined: 4 years ago

I not sure that RCW requires that you show encroachments on a Record of Survey. Good practice dictates that you inform your client of encroachments that you uncover, but there is no need to gossip about it.   

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