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R= vs L= Quick Question  

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airpix
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I am a landowner and don't have any experience reading a survey plan. Could some one tell me what the actual frontage along the road is in regards to the attached small portion of our plan? Is it  L=167.25' or R=220.00' ? I assume it's 167.25" but I would greatly appreciate knowing for sure.

John / Airpix

plot plan question rR vs L

plot plan question rR vs L

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Tim Reed
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L= Length of Curve, or Arc Length.

R= Radius of Curve.

Delta= Angular difference of the radial lines intersecting the two end points of the curve known as the PC (Point of Curvature) and PT (Point of Tangency)

167.25 is the lot frontage.

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Dave Karoly
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R=radius

L=length along the curve.

The triangle=delta=the included angle of the arc.

((43°33'24"/360)*440)*3.1416)=167.25'

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Jim Frame
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Perhaps the most important thing for the owner to realize is that the frontage distance of 167.25' is measured along the arc.  If he stretches a tape from one front corner toward the other and measures the frontage distance, he's going to overshoot the other corner.  The chord (straight-line) distance is only 163.25'.

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Bill93
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Posted by: holy cow

The comment on the small difference, in this case, between the arc length and a straight-lined measurement is very important. 

I wouldn't call 167.25 versus 163.25 a small difference.

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thebionicman
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If you're buying it's huge, selling not so much...

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John Putnam
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Another quick heads up to the OP.  When surveyors work in feet it is conventionally annotated in decimal feet.  Thus the .25' = 3".

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