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OSHA Rules for heat  

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Just A. Surveyor
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Guys if you live or work anywhere around the South or South East it is gonna be another scorcher today and be sure to take frequent breaks and drink lots of water.

And in that same vein of thought, does anyone know the OSHA rules for working in extreme heat or for that matter extreme cold. It seems to me that of all the employers I worked for in the past NONE took into consideration the head and humidity or cold. I kinda wonder how many know of the OSHA rules for field workers and the requirements for frequent water breaks.

If someone has those rules handy can you post them. 

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SPMPLS
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Heat Illness Prevention Program. I believe that every employer is required to have one. Lots of information provided by the links found here:

https://www.osha.gov/heat/

 

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rochs01
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@spmpls

Was this a Freudian slip:

of all the employers I worked for in the past NONE took into consideration the head

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SPMPLS
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You should find a better employer then. If you work in one of the 22 states shown in lighter blue here, the OSHA approved State plan applies to private employers as well as  state and local governments:

https://www.osha.gov/dcsp/osp/index.html

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SPMPLS
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Here is a tool for putting together a compliant HIPP in California.

https://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/etools/08-006/index.htm

It must be in writing (multiple languages as dictated by the demographics of the employees) and available to all employees and Cal/OSHA representatives upon request. There are a few exceptions, mostly federal work related (military bases, tribal lands, etc), otherwise, every employer is required to have one. Heat exposure kills. Why any employer would willingly put their assets/employees at risk of illness or death, not to mention the huge exposure to fines and/or criminal prosecution is beyond my comprehension.

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Andy Bruner
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Also look at:

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/prevention.html

It is linked from the previous link.  If OSHA rules are applicable to you you'd BETTER have a written protocol for your workers.  Speaking from experience in dealing with OSHA, "If it ain't documented it didn't happen".  If you are ever audited by OSHA they WILL find something "wrong".

Andy

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