Community Forums

Share:

Marking Irons used by GLO Surveyors  

Page 1 / 2

J. Penry
Posts: 1439
Member
(@j-penry)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

The term 'marking iron' to mark government corners goes back to at least 1831. They are mentioned in the 1851 Iowa and Wisconsin Manual and also subsequent manuals.

I read some early testimony in Nebraska where a settler testified that he observed the GLO stakes were marked with 'marking irons' to put figures on the stakes in 1881. He didn't specifically say it was a branding iron, but I can envision the crew sitting around the campfire and marking the stakes ahead of time for the next days work.

Has anyone ever seen a 'marking iron'? I assume they might have been Roman Numerals. So, if you ever come across a very small I, V, X, L, C, D, or M branding iron, it might have been used by a surveyor.

They still might have had the letters T, R, N, S, E and W.

TXXVN RXVIIW

T25N R17W

5 Replies
Bill93
Posts: 5524
Member
(@bill93)
5,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Could that just be another name for a timber scribe tool? The one that works a little like a drawing compass with a cutter instead of a pencil for making arcs, plus another cutter on the side for straight lines.

From Berntsen:

Reply
J. Penry
Posts: 1439
Member
(@j-penry)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

I think you are probably correct in what we now call a timber scribe was formerly called a marking iron.

Reply
paden cash
Posts: 9295
Member
(@paden-cash)
5,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Consider antiquated conversational English

Back in the day we had shootin' irons, cookin' irons, markin' irons...:pinch:

Reply
Moe Shetty
Posts: 1384
Member
(@moe-shetty)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Consider antiquated conversational English

tire iron, clothes iron, branding iron...

Reply
Page 1 / 2