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Local Coordinate System  

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Norman Oklahoma
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What proportion of your surveys are on a local coordinate system?   

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linebender
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Zero % for more than 20 years

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Jack Chiles
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99% of our surveys are tied to the Texas Coordinate System. Even when we begin with assumed coordinates, we end up on Texas Plane Coordinates eventually, but almost all of our work will pass through city, county or state review and will have to meet their minimum specs.

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oldpacer
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98%, Like previously stated, why twist and squish a Boundary Survey and make it difficult to use, just so it fits the rest of the world.

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linebender
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Been biting my tongue on this for a while but here it goes. Most of the replies to this post boggle the mind.  Of all things one would think would have the most value for being situated correctly on the globe you would think boundaries would be at the top of the list. Surveyors really screwed up not being the first to realize and promote this. Not only is it not promoted, it's discouraged by most. Here we are in 2018 and everything imaginable gets assigned geographic coordinates except boundary surveys. Come on, man! 

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JKinAK
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If you mean local arbitrary system not tied to WGS84: less than 2%

If you mean local low distortion projection that is geodetically referenced: greater than 98%

If you mean both: 100%

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John Putnam
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Off the top of my head I can't think of the last time I set up a project on random / local coordinate system.  I have been brought in to work on projects that appear to be local (without proper meta data it is hard to say).  Just this morning, the practice of tying into an established system paid off big time.  At the end of October I did a little design survey for about 600 feet of track realignment in a mill.  The engineer was supposed to design it the next day so I could turn around and lay it out.  I set two control points and tied them to the ORGN.  The plans were not completed until yesterday.  I went today to find that one of my two points had been the victim of a utility relocation crew at the end of last week.  Being able to set a new point saved my bacon.

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Norman Oklahoma
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By local coordinate system I mean 5000/5000 (or similar) with bearings based on some classical method such as an old survey line, compass, sunshot,  or just assumed. Not geodetically referenced.

For the record I would wager that well over 90% of surveys done in the Portland/Vancouver area are on local systems.   

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Williwaw
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Maybe 5% of the jobs I do are done on local systems. They tend to be small  and simple jobs done using conventional equipment where the scope is very limited, or they're based on legacy work that was done on such a system where it's just easier and less hassle to stay within the confines of what had been done previously. These days 95% of my work is done in State Plane and tied to the CORS network. I'm just finishing up a project utilizing ties from four previous surveys done over the last decade. Likely saved me several days of work and my client never argues when I save them money by recycling data they've already paid for once. 

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