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Jim in AZ
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A pin is a small pointed wire used by tailors and people who sew. 

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Scott Ellis
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Posted by: Jim in AZ

A pin is a small pointed wire used by tailors and people who sew. 

I thought a pin was the code you entered into the ATM to get money out.

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C.Tompkins
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By law in our state, you are supposed to describe the exact nature of the corner found or set. It sure saves head scratching in even 5 years if that is followed like it is should be.

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not my real name
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@ C. Tompkins. We are not required. However, it is suggested to make a thorough description. I feel that it is a common sense approach and will help in later recoveries. I'm all for that.

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holy cow
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Tain't no pin.  It's a stob.

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Mark Mayer
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Tradesmen who are normally associated with the use of pipes - plumbers - refer to pipes by the nominal inside diameter.  Go down to your local supply store and try to buy some 5/8" iron pipe. No one there will have any clue what WTF you are talking about. After you leave they will talk about you for years. So I reference it by it nominal, not actual, inside diameter like everybody else other than surveyors does. 

People who use reinforcing iron for its intended purpose never refer to it as pins. They call it bar in its long form and rods (or, in specific cases, dowels) when it is shorter, as a survey monument  is. So I call it iron rod, by the nominal diameter, like everybody else other than surveyors does.   

IP = iron pipe

IR=iron rod

 

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