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flyin solo
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couple thoughts immediately come to mind:

1. i'd wanna get real familiar with what the restrictions are for the adjoining single family subdivision.  because if somebody can buy (or currently own) one of those lots, tear the house down and convert it into r.o.w. for a potential new subdivision, then you have additional "competitors" to worry about.

2. round these parts "sheriff's sale" would basically equate to the owner throwing in the towel and taking pencil shavings for their investment.  and even if it washes out in the scheme of their bigger picture, i would think a phone call or two to somebody who might hear a reasonable offer might mean you could subvert their usual by-the-book thing and get it for pencil shavings + a six pack or so.

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Daniel Ralph
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I would expect that an owner along Clifton Road might have an interest in this parcel so you should be watching for one of those to go up for sale. If there are no barriers to development like wetlands, steep slope, drainage, or something else and if utilities could be extended to it one could tear down a house and provide access, develop it into ten or so lots and retire. 

Are you sure that the two parcels to the left of it that form a triangle are not subject to an easement to get to this parcel? That seems natural. 

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BStrand
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How did the county convey the parcel to the bill collector if there is no deed anywhere? 

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Scott Ellis
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@bstrand

Its the remainder/residue of the original tract 

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BStrand
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@scott-ellis

OK.  But there should still be a document somewhere saying as much, yes?

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Scott Ellis
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@bstrand

Maybe, it just depends on if it has been Surveyed. According to the original post it has not been. Depending on who does the legal description of the tract it could be... being an XX acre tract Save and Expect and list all of the other tracts out of it, or it could say the remainder of an XX tract, or it could be by metes and bounds. This should also be the Junior tract so whatever is left is what is left.

If I was doing the Survey I would call it the residue of an XX tract and then described it by metes and bounds.

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FL/GA PLS.
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I have no idea about your delima, however, if someone other than you purchases the property you will be in an excellent financial position with respect to ingress/egress. You could sell, lease or rent access. 😎 

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hpalmer
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My comments mixed in below.  I have some experience with these issues but had a good attorney and court system to sort them out:

This was leftover from a subdivision of a larger property, but it was never included on any subdivision plans. The company that owned it went out of business in the 1970's, and no taxes have been paid on it since then. The county sold it (along with thousands of other tax delinquent parcels) to a company that tries to collect the back taxes. However, that is just one of three taxing bodies (municipal, school district, and county). I did contact the company that owns the back taxes, they said they would be willing to put it up for sheriff's sale, not even sure how that would work. 

I don't think adverse possession (which would be 20 (or 21?) years) is an option. The school district has by far the highest tax millage, so the back taxes could be quite substantial. However, since there is no other access, I doubt they will ever be able to recoup that, maybe they would be happy with some fraction? 

In any case, there is no deed, other than the overall deed for the larger parcel that was subdivided. No deed book or page is listed on the county web site. What is done in a case like this? 

I tried to convince my lawyer daughter to study real estate law when she was in law school, but they never listen...

Just looking for some ideas and insight...

 

first, this appears to be an escheat sale.  Not sure all the above info is correct as (depending on state law) only the taxing entity as authorized by state legislature has the authority to tax a parcel - each state is different.  Generally when a property is sold for back taxes (escheat) the taxes are paid out of the sale and the property is conveyed fee simple.  The question is obtaining clear title and obtaining title insurance.  If the escheat sale was conducted in accordance with state statute, this should not be an issue.

 

As far as 'landlocked' land, not sure there is such a thing as most all properties have been accessed at one time or another.  The issue may be proving a right to that access.  Deeded access is another issue.  In our area, a court often grants a defined access in situations like you describe but the grantee needs to pay the value for the access.

Hire the best real estate attorney who has experience with these issues in the state you reside.

As an option, if a public entity holds title to the property, then make them an offer subject to clear title.

good luck,

 

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John Hamilton
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@hpalmer

You are correct in that in PA there is no such thing as a landlocked parcel, the owner can petition the courts for access, not sure exactly how that works as I don't think it happens very much. My 8.5 acres is the last undeveloped portion of an original 74 acres, that other parcel is from an adjoiners farm, they were never part of the same parent parcel. Not real sure about the original patent, I think that was actually a different grant from the Penns. The only deed I don't have is the original patent, those are in Harrisburg and not in the local courthouse. 

Now that I have a lawyer in the family (daughter), I will get her to investigate. She works at the law school as a fellow, so she has access to the professors there. 

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P_Bob
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@hpalmer

I believe it is very hard to do, but I think in certain situations you can landlock yourself.  If you sell off all your road frontage, without granting yourself a right of way, or already having a visible road or trail back to your property across the land you are selling you can landlock yourself.

 

I don't think the courts would take it very lightly if someone sells of a chunk of land, free and clear of any encumbrances in the deed.  And then the seller comes back later and says they have rights to build a road and cross the land.

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