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aliquot
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It's amazing how little time most Americans spend outside off a sidewalk. Many otherwise fit people look like they don't know how to walk when you get them out into the field. 

I wear the same things for hiking and field work, although it has been over a year since I have done any field work. 

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FL/GA
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@aliquot

I'm just the opposite, whenever I'm on a flat surface I have to walk like a duck to keep my balance . 😎 

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(@reeeshar)
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I also see them with “rookie” looking steel toe boots at times, it makes me smile. All in all, it’s always nice to show the office folk what we see out on the field.

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toivo1037
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@reeeshar

Or the ones that turn up in a brand new brown Carhartt, so stiff they can barely put their arms down.

They think they are getting away with something, like they do this all of the time.  I just wanna rub some mud on a arm to watch them freak out!

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I am learning surveying, so not a surveyor, and my job is a desk job. I can go to work in heels (and sometimes do). I one time was on a volunteer crew doing field work and got assigned the job of weed wacking. It was a warm day, so I had light pants and a t-shirt on. When those weeds or whatever you accidently cut hit you, it HURT!  I had taken a jacket with me that I wore for some protection. I came home and told my husband, now I know why they sell all those carhartts in the front section of the hardware store.  I thought it was just for looks.

 

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holy cow
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@reeeshar

Once upon a time I had an engineering job at a large manufacturing plant.  Day one of employment I was required to purchase a pair of steel-toed shoes.  Anyone visiting an active production building had to be wearing such shoes.  Ninety percent of my work outside of the office was to visit closed production buildings that had been inactive for periods between 15 and 30+ years.  Regular shoes were fine for those facilities.  An excursion into an active production building was rare but did happen.  After more than seven years those shoes still looked almost new as they spent their time under my desk.

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Mike Marks
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I have a lot of respect for drainage engineers who spend a half day touring projects (theirs and others) when the first big rainstorm happens post completion.  They take photographs and make notes on the asbuilt plans.  Very professional.

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holy cow
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@mike-marks

Ah, yes.  I remember such days.  It was fun to watch how the drainage patterns could change over time.  Initially, for example, the flow from a specific area might move north, then stagnate until a certain event happened, then the flow might start heading southward.  That is hard to explain to the average worker who hasn't been out there to witness the real world.

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MightyMoe
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I do have some expensive clothing, white's boots (worth every penny) and some Kuhl pants (also worth every penny), mostly it's wrangler jeans or Carhartt pants, and an assortment of tops and frog toggs when it rains. Everything gets muddy, dirty, sweaty, painted, cow/horse/deer c#!p on it so why spend too much for field wear. 

Had to wade a swampy canal during high water this summer so it was an old pair of sneakers that got thrown out after, I keep around some of those just for that reason. 

 

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(@aksurveyor)
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Cotton kills!

didn't anyone ever tell you that?

I do wear carhartt pants or jeans in the summer, but other than that, I don’t touch cotton. 
Mostly wool, poly-pro, fleece, or synthetic fill products. 
Why would anyone want to work outside and not be warm and comfortable. 

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RADAR
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@aksurveyor

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