Community Forums

Share:

How wet is too wet to survey  

Page 4 / 5

surveyorjake
Posts: 99
Member
(@surveyorjake)
50+ posts
Joined: 5 years ago

Probably been 20 years ago, I was surveying on Mt. Mitchell ( NC) when a cloud came up. I was about a mile out from the tower. Lightning struck somewhere nearby. I remember the flash but not the thunder. Don't know how long I was out but when I came to I was tingling all over for probably 2 hours. No other effects that I can tell although my wife may not agree.  Never had a drop of rain, just the lightning.

Reply
eapls2708
Posts: 1768
Member
(@eapls2708)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Early in my career in the midwest, the truck for the crew I was on had a 0.2'x0.2' square drawn with permanent marker on the windshield just below the rearview.  The rule was if 3 drops hit within the square within a minute, it was raining to much to work.  If it was snow, as long as it wasn't warm enough to melt on the fieldbook pages and we could see a target, we were good to go.

I moved to the Puget Sound area in 1990.  Our instruments had an extra wax seal applied over all rubber seals and that kept the moisture out really well.  We didn't shut down for any amount of rain unless it was also windy enough to blow the rain sideways so that moisture got in through the seams on the bottom of the instrument and if we didn't have any work that could be done without an instrument.  First time it snowed while I was working there, we kept on working until regular quitting time.  By that time there was about 4" accumulated on the ground.  The boss and all coworkers still in the office acted as if I was crazy for working in the snow.  Surveyors who had come up in the Northwet, or had worked there for more than a couple years always made a beeline for the barn at the first sign of flakes.

I don't mind working in cold, snow, or a light to moderate rain.  Hate working in rain when it's windy.  Can't handle working in 90 degrees or higher for more than a couple hours.  I pack it in for heat.

Reply
jim.cox
Posts: 943
Member
(@jimcox)
500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

I started my career on our West Coast.

Its climate is a little like your Pacific North West - ie Sub Tropical rain forest.

Back then, we would get paid extra for "wet time" - defined as starting when we felt the first drop of water run down between the shoulder blades

 

Reply
lmbrls
Posts: 1040
Member
(@lmbrls)
1,000+ posts
Joined: 7 years ago

Somewhere between waist and chest deep. That is for swamp surveys.

Reply
FL/GA PLS.
Posts: 3449
Member
(@flga-pls-2-2)
2,500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

@His most holiest of Bovines and God of methane: to answer your op:   When it's raining.

Rain in FL usually happens in the afternoon. The easterly winds from the Gulf of Mexico collide with the Southeasterly winds from the Atlantic and create horrendous thunderstorms over central Florida. If a front is visually approaching and that usually means visible at 10 miles or so we pack it in. Lightning can strike miles ahead of an approaching storm. When I was employed in South Florida we had a party chief killed and a rodman severely injured when lightning struck a 200’ chain they were at each end of. The party chief was killed instantly. The rodman suffered third degree burns on his legs and feet, the lightning ripped his jeans in half and blew off both his shoes.

After that depressing episode I’ve instructed all my crews when they see approaching black clouds get in the truck until the thing blows over which is usually 30-45 min or so. Mother Nature is sneaky so treat her with respect. You might live longer. 😎 

Reply
Page 4 / 5