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How wet is too wet to survey  

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holy cow
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Some of you must do your work in some truly miserable conditions.  I am one of those who claims to be allergic to rain, for example.  How do you handle being soaked for hours and how do you protect your gear and data?  When is it too wet to survey?

These thoughts popped into my head today while driving for hours on a highway through varying levels of rain intensity.  I was raising quite an aerial wake with my vehicle but couldn't hold a candle to the giant whirlwinds caused by semi-trucks.  Then I saw what I decided was someone who had picked a terrible day to travel.  A one-horse buggy from a nearby Amish community was approaching on the paved shoulder with a semi about to pass it.  WWWHHHOOOOOOSSSHHH!!!    I felt so sorry for that lady.  Once would be enough but that might have been one of several hundred vehicles to drench her on her journey.

Anyone keep surveying through these conditions?

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paden cash
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Posted by: holy cow

 

Anyone keep surveying through these conditions?

Not on your life.  Drying out levels and theodolites was bad enough "back in the day"...but after paying for new DC screen because of working in the rain, I decided to stay indoors when it's wet...too expensive.

Did I mention sending my Topcon GR5 to the shop because rain shorted out the on-off button? 

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jsavage977
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Haven't you heard of the 10 drop rule? A true fair weather surveyor says when 10 drops of rain or more hit the windshield you don't get out of the truck! 🤣 

Personally I work through light rain, but when it gets to the point lathe gets too wet to write on, paint don't stick to anything, and the data collector screen is unreadable I call it a day. In light rain I just wear a Carhartt rain coat. It's pretty nice and keeps the light sprinkling rain out of my pockets and off my head.

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Norman Oklahoma
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It's never too wet to survey in Oregon/Washington. It does, occasionally, get too windy/thunder/lightning. But it rarely rains that drenching thunderstorm downpour you see on the plains.

Our equipment gets wet almost daily in winter and it is hardly ever a problem.    

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Howard Surveyor
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As Norman says. In the PNW, if you don't get out in it, you ain't gonna get nothing done. Plus, it keeps the dust down most of the year and the ground is not to hard to drive a hub into.

Nothing wakes you up more on a dark, winter, Monday morning than putting on the cold, damp rain gear you forgot to take out of the rig on Friday afternoon and hang to dry. 

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Charles L. Dowdell
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When I worked for a firm in Lake Oswego, if you didn't work in the rain, you didn't work. Put on your rain suit, use "Rite in the Rain" field books and get going. The day before Thanksgiving 1989, completly lost the vernier in the T-16 due to moisture buildup in the instrument. Could see the minute portion, but the degrees portion was not even a ghosted outline. After a four day weekend and stting in the instrument room, it was back to normal. 

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Bill93
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As mentioned in another thread I got rained out today, but that was mainly because I was running the receivers on an extension cord from the house and the office support module isn't as rain resistant as the receiver and antenna.  I have collected GPS data in serious rain but the result wasnt usable, probably due to different conditions at the CORS.

The OR and WA guys will be along shortly to laugh at us.

Edit: even before I got my post done ....

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A Harris
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Don't stay out any longer than you would if hunting, stranded and walking miles to your home, you are part reptile and/or the force of the storm knocks you off your feet and especially when you find it difficult to breath because there is more water than air.

When lightning appears, rain or shine, pack it and leave asap.

Remember, your equipment costs are part of your budget. The old TDS HP48 environment case came with a tube of gel to coat the o-ring between the body and cover. Seals need cleaning or replaced for warranties to stand and for proper protection Today's gear has maintenance needs too for it perform in nature.

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