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How do you deal with the heat?  

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Williwaw
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We in Alaska, where temperatures are usually around 65^F this time of the year, are now experiencing our second week straight of temperatures up to 90 in the shade and above. Everything is parched, so to add to this misery smoke from fires burning to the north and south has visibility down to a mile or less at times. For those that live in the south, how do you keep from keeling over from heat stroke? I brought a gallon of ice water with me today and it was gone by lunch. I tell you, if this is the new norm, it sucks. How you folks manage down south is beyond me. Chance of rain by the weekend. Better hurry before the whole blasted place goes up in smoke. The mild winters have the forest loaded with beetle killed spruce, which firefighters like to refer to as 'gasoline on a stick', and they're everywhere. 

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Just A. Surveyor
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Well........you adapt and learn to not fight it. Cotton is a no no and there are cotton fields all around me but I do not wear cotton. I wear long sleeve wicking shirts, Tru-Spec pants, and a boonie hat with one of those cool wrap bandanas that ya soak in ice cold water and it works.

I come out of the heat before it is the hottest,  usually I call it by 1pm and then I draft or whatever. I drink many gallons of water. No beer.

I am usually still quite sweat soaked though.

Or you can try to Work neked!

 

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I was just up your way or in AK at least. Toured from Denali down to Seward. Locals were complaining about extreme heat everywhere we went. I thought it felt great. Upper 70's to low 80's with low humidity felt like a dream compared to N.C. I guess it's what you're used to. 

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Just A. Surveyor
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You have me confused with the OP. I am in N.W. Georgia 1 county away from Alabama. 

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Williwaw
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Coming out of the heat at 1 pm isn't an option. This time of year it's all out for us, 10-12 hour days. I'm using long sleeve vented fishing shirts, lots of ventilation. Soak it in water periodically and ring out and wear. Bandana gets the same treatment, wide brimmed straw hat. I was so disgusted last week after putting in a long day cutting and staking line, on the way back to the office I spotted a lake and pulled over and jumped in. Only took off my shoes. Drove back sopping wet, most comfortable I'd been all week. Suppose I can now strike N.C. and Georgia as possible retirement destinations.

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Andy J
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I've found that ex-officio clothing line is the best for heat and durability.   Tried so many fishing ventilated shirts but all fail on land because they are made to work with a good breeze.

 

 

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paden cash
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Posted by: Andy J

I've found that ex-officio clothing line is the best for heat and durability.   Tried so many fishing ventilated shirts but all fail on land because they are made to work with a good breeze.

 

 

There is definitely a lot to be said for a good breeze.  It's been in the mid-nineties around here with 80% (or higher) humidity the last couple of days.  But there's been a good wind.  And it makes all the difference in the world.

Yesterday I was out on a drilling site that had that infernal 20' tall sheet metal fencing surrounding the entire 660' square perimeter.  Besides screwing with my view of the sky and the multipath it also choked off every bit of wind there was.  It also reflected the sun right down on my neck.  I was wringing wet when I finally got out of there. 

I was watching the drilling crew with their FP coveralls and safety equipment.  I know they had to be hurting.  Some people will be miserable just to make what they think is good money. 

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paden cash
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It's no secret you can't get as much done at a hundred degrees as you can at seventy.  Start early and plan your day to get the "long stuff" out of the way early.  Dress right and drink water 'til you're sick of it...then drink some more.  Getting hydrated and staying that way is something you can't do in a short period of time, it takes time..like days.

And if you take prescription diuretics like me you have to drink even more.

Learning your limit and "where the line is at"  varies from person to person.  Succumbed to the heat ad a quick trip to the ER some years back taught me the dangers of pushing it.  I hate to throw out a cliché but "work smarter, not harder".

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Brad Ott
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I take it slow and easy old man.  3 to 4 hours maximum exposure.  Then done for the day.  1pm IS an option.  Re-think what is behind and pushing this 10-12 hour day “requirement.”

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Andy Bruner
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Williwaw, it's all relative.  We were in England and Scotland last May and they were complaining about the "heatwave".  It got all the way up to 72 degrees.

Personally I'll take our 90 degree days any day to weather where my clothes freeze when they get wet.  Of course I was raised here and have somewhat gotten used to it.

Andy

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