Community Forums

Share:

Cost for adding two corner monuments  

Page 1 / 3

bigtrees
Posts: 13
Member
(@bigtrees)
5+ posts
Joined: 1 year ago

In-laws are wanting a property survey done in Seattle area. They have a 1/3 acre lot that has two corner pins. One I have personally located, the other I think I know where it is but I actually haven't found the rebar. The two other corners need to be set (no previous survey indicates they have ever been set).

How much would it cost to do a property survey in Seattle, inclusive of setting two corner pins?

I know I asked about setting one corner pin, doing a property survey with survey-grade GPS coordinates of the corners for a 40 acre lot in Montana came out to $3000. I think this would be cheaper but not sure how much.

I'm just asking for curiosity. Of course, getting bids is the sure-fire way to know for sure.

17 Replies
2 Replies
not my real name
Member
(@not-my-real-name)
Joined: 6 years ago

250+ posts
Posts: 324

Why are people always asking for bids and pins. Is that all surveying is?

I have a question:

What is behind door number 3 and how much do you want to pay for it?

Reply
bigtrees
Member
(@bigtrees)
Joined: 1 year ago

5+ posts
Posts: 13
Posted by: not my real name

Why are people always asking for bids and pins. Is that all surveying is?

I have a question:

What is behind door number 3 and how much do you want to pay for it?

I'm not asking for a bid. Just wondering if my 2k to 3k guesstimate was in the ballpark or not. (Google says average survey costs $456 which I think is total baloney.)

While nobody will know the cost of this specific parcel, I'm curious what the cost is for the bulk of residential surveys for lots under an acre. Sure they all have unique characteristics, but the bulk of them will come to within a certain price point. Google says that should be around $500. 

This particular county, it costs $200 to record the survey. 

Reply
thebionicman
Posts: 3146
Member
(@thebionicman)
2,500+ posts
Joined: 6 years ago

Bigtrees,

I'll chime in before the fires start...

Giving a reasonable estimate or fixed fee with very little information is a disaster waiting to happen. With research some will give you a wide ranging estimate. Any fixed fee would probably either be from a local surveyor or so high it would scare you off.

The process for determining the boundary is never as simple as grabbing GPS coordinates and setting a rebar. If anyone does it that way start a savings account. You can plan on getting at least halfway to 6 figures in attorneys fees.

I strongly suggest you get some local prices or estimates, taking care to have the surveyor outline what they will and wont do for the money.

Good luck, Tom 

Reply
Peter Lothian
Posts: 407
Member
(@peter-lothian)
250+ posts
Joined: 8 years ago

Personally, I don't throw out cost estimates without knowing more about the particular lot that will need to be surveyed. A specific address is usually where I start because I want to check the current deed and get a better idea of the quality and time frame of surveying done on that lot and in the area. A "1/3 acre boundary survey and set 2 pins in the Boston area" could range in cost from $2,400 to $6,000 depending on all the variables.

Since I'm located in Mass. it would cost a whole lot more than that for me to work on your in-laws' property in Seattle, but if you're willing to pay megadollars for a survey, and wait until I can get a license to practice there, "have theodolite, will travel".

On a side note, our office actually got a call last year from a guy trying to find a surveyor to do some work in The Democratic Republic of the Congo. We declined to pursue that work due to the logistics, and the risk of being shot by poachers.

Reply
bigtrees
Posts: 13
Member
(@bigtrees)
5+ posts
Joined: 1 year ago

I'm just asking for idle curiosity's sake.

A range (even a big one) is fine. I mentioned it might be $2000 to $3000 to my MIL. She was flabbergasted, and now wants to prove that I am wrong.

Looking online, I see the "average" survey is $456. I think that number is a joke.

I guess my question should be, is my guess that it might run a couple grand (based on my experience with the 40 acre parcel in Montana) something reasonable to throw out? While I know that bigger properties cost more, I also know that it's cheaper in Montana than Seattle. Or is the average of $500 more reasonable?

She'll figure out what the actual cost is. I'm just trying to decide if my $2000 or $3000 grand estimate was a "stupid" number to throw out, or ballpark reasonable for the starting point of a discussion.

Reply
1 Reply
thebionicman
Member
(@thebionicman)
Joined: 6 years ago

2,500+ posts
Posts: 3146

Your 2 to 3 K could easily be a little light. I've gone over 500 on estimates...

Reply
Bill93
Posts: 5519
Member
(@bill93)
5,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

As mentioned, the price will depend a lot on what has been done in the past in that neighborhood.  If it was well-monumented originally, a good fraction of those monuments at or close to the subject property remain, and dimensions on the ground are close to theoretical (deed) the it will be a lot less than if there is very little monumentation and the original layout was inaccurate.  Complications such as identifying improvement over the line onto or off of the property will take careful documentation as well as measurement.  Many states require a record be filed with the county or state when monuments are set or a material discrepancy with past documentation found.  Filing fees for required documentation vary greatly around the country - some places a full survey can be filed for $20 and others $1000 or more.

So numbers from around the country from people who have not seen or researched the specific property are pretty much meaningless.

Reply
Page 1 / 3