Community Forums

Share:

Blast from the Past GPS  

Page 2 / 5

Bill68
Posts: 38
Member
(@bill68)
20+ posts
Joined: 4 years ago

Around 1989 at the University of Maine we were using early Trimble units powered by car batteries.  We had to go out around midnight to observe enough satellites.  After college it wasn't until 1996 when we purchased a mapping grade Trimble ProXL.

Reply
I. Ben Havin
Posts: 372
Member
(@i-ben-havin)
250+ posts
Joined: 7 years ago

Acquired 3 leica base/rover sr530 setups (total of 6) in 2000, and that was a game changer. Had a pair of Trimble 4000 SSE's (RTK) and a pair of Novatel (static) units in the 1990's. From about 1995 all jobs have been in SPCS.

Reply
GeeOddMike
Posts: 988
Member
(@geeoddmike)
500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Prompted by this thread, I did a little reminiscing about early equipment. I was surprised to see an advertisement for an Allen Osborne Associates Turbo Rogue SNR-8000 field receiver. Only $361 (USD).

I know nothing about the seller but in case anyone wants to see the ad, the site address for the ad is: https://www.bonanza.com/listings/Turbo-Rogue-SNR-8000-Gps-Survey-And-Navigation-Receiver-By-Allen-Osborne/520200141?goog_pla=1&gpid=341761184097&keyword=&goog_pla=1&pos=1o1&ad_type=pla&gclid=EAIaIQobChMImf3nkt3R5AIVCNlkCh3zfAtyEAkYASABEgKrmfD_BwE

Interesting that the seller touts its being a Geodetic-quality instrument suitable for geophysical studies. It tracks eight (8) satellites (GPS only).

I started with the Trimble 4000SST about 1991(?)  even attended a three-day training class at Trimble in Sunnyvale learning Trimvec and Trimnet.   

16EF784D 24E6 426F A9A3 E979DE9ACFEE
DCBC7771 C4C9 4ECF BC81 D534FD758AC7

Reply
1 Reply
JOHN NOLTON
Member
(@john-nolton)
Joined: 9 years ago

250+ posts
Posts: 254

@geeoddmike

The TurboRogue was the top of the line GPS unit in the day. They were made in Westlake Village, CA and

cost around $25,000. One of USGS personnel left one unattended and it was stolen (of course).

I don't know if he had to repay USGS or not.

I had the company come to a base line that was measured by the Kern Mekometer ME5000 to test their unit.

It was a very nice day and around 95 F. The unit shut down soon because it was too hot.

 

JOHN NOLTON

Reply
John Hamilton
Posts: 2651
Member
(@john-hamilton)
2,500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Macrometer V1000 in 1986. Then Wild WM101 (one week only), then all Trimbles starting at 4000S, then 4000SL, 4000SX, 4000SE, 4000SSE, 4000SSi, 4400, 4700, 4800, 5700, R7, R8, R10, and newest Alloy. 

Reply
7 Replies
hpalmer
Member
(@hpalmer)
Joined: 9 years ago

100+ posts
Posts: 117

@john-hamilton

In December 1998, we purchased Leica 530's sight unseen w/delivery a few months later.  In the 2000/2001 time frame, we worked with Brian Daniels, Leica, to set up base station broadcasting rtk corrections to the 530's that is still in operation today - thank you Brian.

If anyone knows where I can find a Wild 101, let me know as I have a friend who wants one.

Reply
jt1950
Member
(@jt50)
Joined: 4 months ago

50+ posts
Posts: 59

@hpalmer

 

I have one. It belonged to my father. Did not even know that he had it until I went through his things in storage. I believe I have 2 units as these were used in pairs for static survey but I have not yet located the 2nd unit in the storage room. 

 

While I was doing research for the unit I found at the time , I came across this auction list from Australia. It was sold for $20.

https://www.evansclarke.com.au/detail.aspx?id=1007490

 

Reply
NorthernSurveyor
Member
(@northernsurveyor)
Joined: 9 years ago

250+ posts
Posts: 454

@jt50

Thats a Magnavox 1500 Transit Satellite system receiver, not GPS.  I used these as well.   The US Navy Transit system was used primary to update the position and velocities of INS systems in submarines and Navy vessels, prior to GPS.   The commercial units Magnavox provided were very novel for the day.  Only one receiver was required, it was set out to collect data for a 24 hour period, to arrive at a post-processed position of +/- 1 meter.   Keep in mind, these were used before PC's (Personal Computers) were available so you needed a UNIX box or mainframe to process data.   Back in the day, I think the retail value was $100k + per unit.  

Reply
jt1950
Member
(@jt50)
Joined: 4 months ago

50+ posts
Posts: 59

@northernsurveyor

It's a WM101 L1/L2 . It comes with a GPS antenna and battery pack and data is recorded onto the cassette tapes. Very heavy and solidly built.

a101

 

Reply
NorthernSurveyor
Member
(@northernsurveyor)
Joined: 9 years ago

250+ posts
Posts: 454

@jt50

 

Interesting

Perhaps WM stands for Westinghouse Magnavox?   Can't remember the history of equipment that clear, but WM-101 rings a bell.  Probably a predecessor to the MX-1501, but I am pretty sure thats a USN Transit "Doppler" satellite receiver.  Keyboard and interface looks the same as 1501.

Reply
jt1950
Member
(@jt50)
Joined: 4 months ago

50+ posts
Posts: 59

@northernsurveyor

Wild Magnovox, eventually I think Wild (or Leica) bought the commercial GPS unit of Magnavox.

Reply
NorthernSurveyor
Member
(@northernsurveyor)
Joined: 9 years ago

250+ posts
Posts: 454

@jt50

Ah ha!!!!   Thanks.

Reply
GeeOddMike
Posts: 988
Member
(@geeoddmike)
500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

For photos of the Macrometer see the previous thread: https://rplstoday.com/community/surveying-geomatics/any-members-of-the-geezer-patrol-have-experience-with-one-of-these/

Closest I ever came to one of these was at NGS HQ.

 

Reply
1 Reply
NorthernSurveyor
Member
(@northernsurveyor)
Joined: 9 years ago

250+ posts
Posts: 454

@geeoddmike

I watched Dr. James Collins demonstrate acquiring and processing data with a Macrometer probably around 1986 or so, can't remember.   Note that it only measured the doppler shift of the signal, no code or phase data from the first GPS satellites.   

Reply
Page 2 / 5
Default
:)
:d
:wink:
:mrgreen:
:neutral:
:twisted:
:arrow:
:shock:
:???:
:cool:
:evil:
:oops:
:razz:
:roll:
:cry:
:eek:
:lol:
:mad:
:sad:
:!:
:?:
:idea:
:hmm:
:beg:
:whew:
:chuckle:
:silly:
:envy:
:shutmouth: