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Stolen R10 Tulsa, OK  

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Mark Silver
Posts: 630
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Danno, our insurance guy says that claims are like baseball "Three strikes and your out." So you might have one more strike left.

Did you let the police know the cost of the device. They may have assumed that it was a $500 instrument, not the equivalent of a new pickup truck.

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Jon Collins
Posts: 365
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(@jon-collins)
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Joined: 4 years ago

They will get $300 for ot at a pawn shop

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John Hamilton
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Since I had not received an email with the last data file collected (receiver would have sent it to me next time it was powered on, as configured), I assumed the unit may not have been retrieved from where ever it was ditched, either the gas station/convenience store or the Lowes.

I got my replacement unit on Friday, so I was configuring a new sim card for it. I went to my dynamic dns provider and saw that the IP address was updated on 9/9, two days after it was stolen. That means it was powered on at least long enough to update the IP address, but probably not long enough to send the file. So someone does have it. Mad

That unit had an RTX subscription, which is activated "over-the-air" via geosynchronous satellite link, the same link that supplies the RTX data. It occurred to me that Trimble could offer a service to "disable" the receiver over that link when stolen, and that is something that could not be defeated by removing a sim card or otherwise reconfiguring the unit. It wouldn't prevent all thefts, but it would make the receiver a worthless doorstop if stolen which might remove some of the incentive if word got out out that there was no resale value.

One more comment-anyone who would buy a GNSS receiver (or total station) for a deeply discounted price would have to know it is stolen, and they are just as much of a scumbag as the person who stole it. I realize that it may go through several hands and the price may look like a legitimate sale, but I would NEVER buy such an item without knowing where it came from. We need a national registry of stolen equipment. NSPS does have a web page listing items, but I feel it needs to be more formalized and widely publicized. Automobiles, which are of similar value new, have VIN numbers that go into a database when stolen, and that makes it easier to recover. It doesn't eliminate thefts, of course. And thieves do send a lot of stuff out of the country.

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Mark Mayer
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John Hamilton, post: 393559, member: 640 wrote: anyone who would buy a GNSS receiver (or total station) for a deeply discounted price would have to know it is stolen, and they are just as much of a scumbag as the person who stole it.

If I where contemplating the purchase of a slightly used R10 I would be contacting my friendly neighborhood Trimble dealer to find out about the unit's service history. If the seller's name is the same as the person who has had it serviced from time to time, I'd be felling pretty good about his right to sell.

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John Hamilton
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I bought a slightly used one directly from my dealer.

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