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sUAS operation letter to property owners  

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Jim Frame
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Let's say something goes wrong, the drone crashes in front of a car driving down the street, the driver panics and crashes into a utility pole and is seriously injured.  Their insurance company sues your company, and you turn to your own insurer and say, "Whew -- I'm sure glad we bought that drone liability coverage."  And your insurance company points to Part 107 and says, "Sorry, you weren't operating in accordance with FAA regs as stipulated in your policy, we deny your claim."  What then?

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StLSurveyor
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Posted by: Jim Frame

Let's say something goes wrong, the drone crashes in front of a car driving down the street, the driver panics and crashes into a utility pole and is seriously injured.  Their insurance company sues your company, and you turn to your own insurer and say, "Whew -- I'm sure glad we bought that drone liability coverage."  And your insurance company points to Part 107 and says, "Sorry, you weren't operating in accordance with FAA regs as stipulated in your policy, we deny your claim."  What then?

For this particular operation the road will be closed to traffic. There is also a process where we can apply for a waiver to fly over humans. While this is not commonly granted the FAA is aware that this is a great need for us professionals and as long as we show that our aircraft has methods (ie parachute) to reduce the amount of force upon impact and the mission is flown with great care and notice to all the waiver could be granted. 

Here is a good article and info on this waiver application

https://www.dronepilotgroundschool.com/faa-waiver-flying-over-people/

 

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chris mills
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Posted by: Jim Frame

Let's say something goes wrong, the drone crashes in front of a car driving down the street, the driver panics and crashes into a utility pole and is seriously injured.  Their insurance company sues your company, and you turn to your own insurer and say, "Whew -- I'm sure glad we bought that drone liability coverage."  And your insurance company points to Part 107 and says, "Sorry, you weren't operating in accordance with FAA regs as stipulated in your policy, we deny your claim."  What then?

There's always some element of doubt as to how the rules are interpreted. Following several incidents with DJI Matrice and Inspire suffering power failure in flight the UK CAA issued a safety notice on 9th. November. This restricted those particular makes of aircraft from carrying out any overflight of persons at any height, but clarified the rule that a minimum distance of 50m. needs to be kept from any person - 150 metres where large numbers are present OUTSIDE.

In the example Jim quotes, the aircraft would have presumably been more than 50 metres away from the vehicle when failure occurred, otherwise the car would have been past before the aircraft crashed. There's also the problem of how the different types crash. A rotary will generally drop more or less straight down, but a fixed wing will probably glide for up to 500 metres. Paradoxically, the safest place for a fixed wing is probably directly above the crowd!

 

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StLSurveyor
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I agree and think that the "letter" should come from the Public (ie City). I know there will always be people shooting at drones but a letter serves as as notice of good will and respect for the general public privacy. The technology is here and will become common place we just need to find the best way to get the general public to accept and acknowledge that we are keeping their best interest in mind. 

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thebionicman
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The FAA issues guidance documents for many of their rules. I get updates every week or two and they are very helpful.

Most of my projects were over open and active roadways. Not a big deal if you mitigate exposure by adjusting flight lines to avoid continuous flight over occupied lanes.

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MightyMoe
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It almost seems easier to hire it done the old fashioned way. We just had a huge area flown and I couldn't believe how cheap it was. Drones would have cost 5-10 times as much at least. 

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StLSurveyor
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Posted by: MightyMoe

It almost seems easier to hire it done the old fashioned way. We just had a huge area flown and I couldn't believe how cheap it was. Drones would have cost 5-10 times as much at least. 

I agree on most large projects. But on small'ish projects I can fly at 250-300 feet and get enough detail to count shingles, read the words on manhole lids, see pavement cracks and joint lines. And I can have that info in about 15 mins. I would think it would be difficult to get that from manned aircraft flying at 2500-3500 feet. But then again they have serious cameras and lots of Voodoo...

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FL/GA PLS.
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Just do it, by the time you are done they won't even know what was going on.  ? 

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