Community Forums

Hello everyone! Loo...
 
Share:

Hello everyone! Looking to get into residential surveying  

Page 2 / 2
  RSS
RADAR
(@dougie)
2,500+ posts Member

This post quickly took a tun for the worst...

Image result for this took a turn for the worst memes

I never did a day's work in my life. It was all fun.--Thomas A. Edison

Citius, altius, fortius

ReplyQuote
Posted : February 11, 2019 3:59 pm
Brad Ott liked
SCarolina
(@scarolina)
FNG Member
Posted by: Dallas Morlan

I am from Ohio and not an expert on Professional Land Surveying in your state, your profile indicates that is South Carolina.  You should verify the information provided below with a local Professional Surveyor. 

A few minutes research provided me with links to the South Carolina State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers and Surveyors.  That site provides information on Professional Surveyor license requirements. I believe that running your own surveying business will require you to qualify for a Professional Surveying "TIER A" license.

The Laws and Policies link at right of the above page includes a link to "Engineers & Surveyors Statute (Effective March 2018)" the current law.  That link opens a 23 page pdf file containing the license requirements.  The definitions section makes clear the difference between TIER A and TIER B licenses.  The section that defines the TIER A requirements is on page 14, "SECTION 40-22-225. Eligibility requirements for license as surveyor."  As I read this the requirement is a very specific four year college degree, two examinations and four years of experience under the supervision of a currently licensed Professional Surveyor.

That’s a good start, thank you for the links! I am in SC and would like to be licensed in NC as well since I’m only a few minutes away from the border. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : February 12, 2019 7:05 am
SCarolina
(@scarolina)
FNG Member
Posted by: Bill93
Posted by: SCarolina

are there specific books you guys recommend I pick up?

A generally recommended textbook is Elementary Surveying by Wolf and Ghilani (any recent edition).  It will give you an idea of how much there is to learn on the technical side.  Then you need the boundary law side.

Do some more reading on this forum to get a feel for what surveyors deal with and worry about.

I’ll have to pick it up this weekend.

ReplyQuote
Posted : February 12, 2019 7:09 am
SCarolina
(@scarolina)
FNG Member
Posted by: Williwaw

Occasionally I have to remind some people that in order to obtain my license I had to attend several years of advanced studies at a university and work under the supervision of many different surveyors, all of which took more than eight years, or roughly the equivalent amount of time required to become a doctor.  

When you mention advanced studies at a university are those master level classes? I have a bachelors degree but was think about taking a few classes offered at my local community college that teach surveying.

ReplyQuote
Posted : February 12, 2019 7:16 am
WorkerBee
(@bee)
5+ posts Member
Posted by: SCarolina
Posted by: Williwaw

Occasionally I have to remind some people that in order to obtain my license I had to attend several years of advanced studies at a university and work under the supervision of many different surveyors, all of which took more than eight years, or roughly the equivalent amount of time required to become a doctor.  

When you mention advanced studies at a university are those master level classes? I have a bachelors degree but was think about taking a few classes offered at my local community college that teach surveying.

According to the State Board of Engineers and Surveyors in South Carolina, you need a bachelor’s in Land Surveying to be a licensed surveyor in SC. If you want something better paying than entry-level, it’s going to require career-specific education and testing.

ReplyQuote
Posted : February 12, 2019 8:51 am
Duane Frymire
(@duane-frymire)
1,000+ posts Member
Posted by: SCarolina
Posted by: Williwaw

Occasionally I have to remind some people that in order to obtain my license I had to attend several years of advanced studies at a university and work under the supervision of many different surveyors, all of which took more than eight years, or roughly the equivalent amount of time required to become a doctor.  

When you mention advanced studies at a university are those master level classes? I have a bachelors degree but was think about taking a few classes offered at my local community college that teach surveying.

Having fun/sarcasm aside.  Looks to me like 12-15 semester hour credits at community college might do it for you.  "Board approved" degrees could include yours.  I would contact the board and ask them. 

Because you're interested in boundary surveying I would recommend: Measuring America, by Andro Linklater.  Wealth of information and a bit more enjoyable reading to start off with.

ReplyQuote
Posted : February 12, 2019 10:10 am

iGage Static GPS - GNSS Receivers

Page 2 / 2