Community Forums

30th Anniversary of...
 
Share:

30th Anniversary of First Block II GPS Satellite Launched Into Orbit  

Page 2 / 2

GeeOddMike
Posts: 936
Member
(@geeoddmike)
500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

On the matter of the development of phase measurement, I always appreciated the work of Charles Counselman III and recommend the following short articles.

Charles C. Counselman III

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/422110/charles-c-counselman-iii-64-sm-65-phd-69/

I sort of miss the days when the technology was developing and not so much of a “black box.” Wasn’t it Asimov who said “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic?” Too lazy to look it up.

 

Reply
2 Replies
Loyal
Member
(@loyal)
Joined: 9 years ago

2,500+ posts
Posts: 3083
Posted by: GeeOddMike

On the matter of the development of phase measurement, I always appreciated the work of Charles Counselman III and recommend the following short articles.

Charles C. Counselman III

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/422110/charles-c-counselman-iii-64-sm-65-phd-69/

I sort of miss the days when the technology was developing and not so much of a “black box.” Wasn’t it Asimov who said “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic?” Too lazy to look it up.

 

Arthur C. Clarke (one of his "3 laws")

Reply
Bill C
Member
(@bill-c)
Joined: 3 years ago

20+ posts
Posts: 45

@geeoddmike

I almost mentioned Chuck Counselman in my previous post; he's quite a cool guy. I remember attending a small seminar he gave in the late 1980s or maybe in 1990 about some new ideas in locating satellites to the centimeter or sub-centimeter level. At the end, I asked him what it meant to locate an object several meters in size to that level. 😊 It was kind of a foreshadowing of the "Where on the Rod is the Corner?" discussion here on RPLS Today. For a couple of years afterwards, I had occasional acquaintance with him via a mutual avocation. He exhibited that great combination of being a really smart person and also a really nice person.

Reply
Bill93
Posts: 5519
Member
(@bill93)
5,000+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

The magic quote was Clarke, but I don't recall that he had 3 laws.  Are you thinking of Asimovs 3 laws of robotics?

Reply
4 Replies
Loyal
Member
(@loyal)
Joined: 9 years ago

2,500+ posts
Posts: 3083
Posted by: Bill93

The magic quote was Clarke, but I don't recall that he had 3 laws.  Are you thinking of Asimovs 3 laws of robotics?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarke%27s_three_laws

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Laws_of_Robotics

Reply
Bill93
Member
(@bill93)
Joined: 9 years ago

5,000+ posts
Posts: 5519

Posted by: Loyal

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarke%27s_three_laws

Thanks for the reminder.  There go my credentials as a science fiction reader.

Reply
Loyal
Member
(@loyal)
Joined: 9 years ago

2,500+ posts
Posts: 3083
Posted by: Bill93

Posted by: Loyal

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarke%27s_three_laws

Thanks for the reminder.  There go my credentials as a science fiction reader.

I've been a huge Science Fiction fan as far back as I can remember. I still like some of the early Science Fiction Moves (even some of the bad ones), although many of the newer one rely far too much on "special effects."

Loyal

Reply
Bill93
Member
(@bill93)
Joined: 9 years ago

5,000+ posts
Posts: 5519

Posted by: Loyal

I've been a huge Science Fiction fan as far back as I can remember. I still like some of the early Science Fiction Moves (even some of the bad ones), although many of the newer one rely far too much on "special effects."

Continuing the hijack ...

I prefer semi-realistic SF over fantasy and magic stuff.  I'll accept warp drives and FTL if it's a good story, but don't break the rules of physics where the story doesn't need to.  I don't see a lot of movies because of the terribly unrealistic stuff that could be done right. Swooping aerobatic-appearing maneuvers in space and I'm yelling "No!" at the screen.  The movie Gravity had them catching on to a space station and then, after being at zero relative motion, the guy is somehow pulled away by a force that makes no sense, and that's needed as a key plot point - NO!

I don't read as much as I used to and don't know all the current authors.  My favorites were Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and Friday. Lots of his others were good, too, but some of the later ones got entirely too wordy and strange.  I read some of Asimov and Clarke, Niven, and several others.  I really liked the earlier James Hogan books (before he got too preachy) and was impressed with how his stories were all so different from each other.  He could write a time travel story, a visit to a neutron star, a character figuring out he had a multi-layer mind, or an interplanetary fight with equal ease.

Reply
GeeOddMike
Posts: 936
Member
(@geeoddmike)
500+ posts
Joined: 9 years ago

Thanks for the correction. I envy Bill C’s acquaintance with one of the greats. I have known some really smart people and found most to be on the nice side. Some revealed themselves to be so only after closer acquaintance. 

I ran across an early 90’s presentation ( https://www.slideshare.net/mobile/dr.geophysics/map-projections-datums-gis-and-gps-for-everyone ) that I am pretty sure originated at the NGS. It includes the following slide:

8C2A4D97 6D34 4413 9FD8 1C9AB39D0FF2

Reply
not my real name
Posts: 324
Member
(@not-my-real-name)
250+ posts
Joined: 6 years ago

Happy Anniversary. My profile picture is from 1990. 

Reply
Page 2 / 2