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Waldorf education  

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Dave Karoly
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We are going to enroll our Grandson into a private Waldorf school.  They have a farm, chickens, a cow, and a pig (at least one).  That was a big hit with him.  Two years of Kindergarten.

The kids play outside every day, rain or shine.

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Gene Kooper
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Posted by: Dave Karoly

We are going to enroll our Grandson into a private Waldorf school.  They have a farm, chickens, a cow, and a pig (at least one).

What, no model trains.....SIGH!

P.S.  Your grandson has a darned good grandfather. 

 

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antcrook
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Both my kids go to the local Waldorf school here. They do surveying in 4th or 5th grade and again in high school. 

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Dave Karoly
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Fifth Grade (excerpt):

"Fifth grade studies the earth as an organism with the plant world expressing the life of each region. The child’s expanding view of the world is supported by the study of North American geography and the making of maps in two and three dimensions with a variety of materials."

High School Mathematics (excerpt):

"The Waldorf approach is experiential and interdisciplinary. Students spend considerable time on real world application of concepts presented in the classroom. In trigonometry, our students survey the campus; in biology, they evaluate the ecosystem of our streams; in architecture, they visit local neighborhoods to develop and plan redevelopment and build scale models of their proposals. In this experiential approach, students deepen their learning and fully engage with their studies."

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Jim Frame
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We looked into Waldorf when my son was coming up on school age, but decided against it.  Major factors were cost (around $6k per year back then), the availability of good public schools, the restrictions on off-campus activities (no screens, no competitive sports were a couple that I remember), and the lack of reading instruction in the early grades.  The kids we know who went all the way through the Waldorf program did fine in high school and beyond, though.

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aliquot
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The lack of reading instruction is what turned us off. Why delay the thing that opens up the world to them? It is required to independently learn. The majority of children love the process of learning to read. 

There are a lot of good things about their philosophy though.

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Dave Karoly
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My Mother insisted that I attend a second year of Kindergarten which was almost unheard of then. She didn't think I was ready for first grade yet. So the reading delay doesn't bother me too much.

The public school options aren't good, unfortunately.

We put a daughter through St. Michael's Episcopal but Maimeo (Grandma) doesn't think that school is a good fit for him.

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