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Recording experience for SIT  

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Pole Cat
(@pole-cat)
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December 2, 2018 7:42 pm  

Hi again, im a little embarassed to ask who is keeping track of the hours I work to be submitted for the SIT?  Should I be keeping a log of the communications with my PLS? Is he doing it?  Im a little in the dark


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A Harris
(@a-harris)
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December 2, 2018 8:44 pm  

Everyone beginning in the survey industry should keep a record diary that contains the information of each day's events at work.

I kept mine on a yearly event calendar that bank's gave to customers at the end of each physical year.

RPLS NE Texas
d[-_-]b


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Richard Imrie
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December 2, 2018 9:43 pm  
Posted by: A Harris

Everyone beginning in the survey industry should keep a record diary that contains the information of each day's events at work.

I kept mine on a yearly event calendar that bank's gave to customers at the end of each physical year.

For quite some time there I thought you meant Banks gave your diary out to customers at the end of each year (so that customers could see what you'd been up to?). It's been a long Monday.


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A Harris
(@a-harris)
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December 3, 2018 12:15 am  

It would have been a list of clients and a brief description of the job.

Kinda like a list of references.

RPLS NE Texas
d[-_-]b


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Murphy
(@murphy)
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December 3, 2018 3:01 am  

I jotted mine down in a field book.  Last I knew, Vermont had one of the most all encompassing breakdowns of time.  Take a look at their Land Surveyor Portfolio to get an idea of the level of detail some states require.  NC and Maine, where I'm licensed, required only general breakdowns such as deed research, drafting, fieldwork, writing of descriptions, etc.. Generally, the sooner you start browsing through the specific requirements to be licensed in your state(s), the better.


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Pole Cat
(@pole-cat)
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December 3, 2018 5:58 am  

Wow Vermont looks hefty.  Im in Massachusetts if that helps.  I keep a time sheet with descriptions of what I do every day, but from what you all are saying, it would be considered minimal.  Maybe an agenda is needed...  If anyone has information related directly to Massachusetts that would be fantastic.


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Peter Lothian
(@peter-lothian)
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December 3, 2018 6:08 am  

Your best bet is to download the application form and see what it requires. Mass. probably only asks for a percentage of time spent on various tasks, but don't quote me on that. I got my SIT in Maine, many years ago. For the Mass. PLS application, they want you to submit examples of your work, the total not to weigh more than one pound. It's a good idea to keep copies of your work as you go, sort of an experience portfolio, in addition to a diary or journal. It will save you a lot of running around when you apply for the PLS. It may also save your bacon if any of the companies you once worked for goes out of business, making their records unavailable.


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Peter Lothian
(@peter-lothian)
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December 3, 2018 6:10 am  

Also, if not already a member, you should join MALSCE. Membership in NSPS is included. Membership in professional organizations, and attending continuing education seminars always looks good on the SIT and PLS applications.


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Norman Oklahoma
(@norman-oklahoma)
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December 3, 2018 7:35 am  

In my state, when  I was applying 20 years ago, they wanted tracking on a month by month basis rather than hour by hour. My 8 yr work history at the time consisted of a half dozen different jobs. Finding contact information for some of the earliest ones was hard to come by. Due to pending changes in Oregon's qualification standards at the time I needed every minute of work history verified to qualify.

If you should change jobs or supervisors you might be well to get work experience verifications in your file now, even though you may not be eligible to write for some years to come. If your state will allow that.     

"Convention is like the shell to the chick, a protection till he is strong enough to break it through." Learned Hand


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JPH
 JPH
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December 3, 2018 4:07 pm  

What others have said, it's up to you to keep the record.  There's no state-wide logging or repository of all the hours for each individual. 

If your supervising LS is the type to mentor, then he should be getting you on track, and mentioning to you certain materials and projects that will be good to include in your application.  If he's like mine at that time in my life, I was on my own.

I picked projects that were interesting boundaries, where I was the party chief, took the notes, did the calcs, and then drafted the plan.  I made copies of all that, and submitted 3-4 of those.  Not sure what the requirements are now, though.

And as Peter said, start doing it now, before you change jobs or something happens that makes all those valuable records unavailable to you later on. 

Good luck


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JKinAK
(@jkinak)
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December 3, 2018 5:26 pm  

You can start an NCEES record.

https://help.ncees.org/article/64-what-is-an-ncees-record

It's free to start, track, and keep but they charge to transmit to the licensing board (I think you could just print out screen shots and transmit yourself).

The charges seem expensive (First transmittal: $175  All subsequent transmittals: $75  but I can tell you from personal experience - most... maybe all... licensing examiners appreciate getting your info as an NCEES record - it's organized in a form that they are familiar with and it addresses all of the elements they are concerned with - no chance of them miss-interpreting your info.

Do it now - put your work verification forms in there - you never know when someone who you expect to verify your work is going to become unreachable - people lose years of verifiable experience on a regular basis as people pass away - it happens all the time.

- John


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Pole Cat
(@pole-cat)
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December 4, 2018 5:58 am  

JPH: Im pretty much own my own here... kinda sucks, but honestly I love growing on my own and I think it will make me better in the long run.  JKinAK:  That is awesome and exactly what I was hoping for


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JPH
 JPH
(@jph)
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December 4, 2018 2:28 pm  
Posted by: Pole Cat

JPH: Im pretty much own my own here... kinda sucks, but honestly I love growing on my own and I think it will make me better in the long run.  JKinAK:  That is awesome and exactly what I was hoping for

That's too bad.  You will need some LS references too.  So maybe start networking, and join MALSCE like Peter said.  Hell, he seems to know stuff, maybe you should contact him, since he's in Mass too.

As far as the NCEES record, no way in hell would I pay some entity to do what I can do on my own.  I don't really see the need for something like that. 


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