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Object laying on the ground -or- lying on the ground?  

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Dave Karoly
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Every English prof explanation I find of this makes no sense.

It's lie unless it's in the nominative reverse left handed case then obviously it is lay.

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mkennedy
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I have a recollection (vague, very vague) that 'lie' should be used for animate objects like people and 'lay' is for inanimate objects like books. Just about every time I try to use 'lay' though, it sounds wrong to me. 

Ah, if the sentence takes a direct object, use lay. I lie down on the couch. I lay down the book on the couch. Because an inanimate object generally won't lie itself down, it uses 'lay.' 

When you start getting into the past tense and present/past participles--forget it! 

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Loyal
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For my purposes, "found Original Stone...lying...laying... ah screw it...LOOSE on the ground" (problem solved)!

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dgm-pls
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Could always just put it back where it belongs 😉

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foggyidea
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I guess if was a fake stone it could be lying on the ground....

According to my Holt Handbook 6th edition, "Lie means to recline and does not take an object ("He likes to lie on the floor"); lay means "to place" or "to put" and does take an object (He wants to lay a rug on the floor).

Obviously the stone was laying on the ground.....

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