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Need a bit of career advice  

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that1surveyor
(@that1surveyor)
50+ posts Registered

I don't often post here, but do lurk often. I've found this to be a very valuable resource of knowledge in numerous subjects. With all the experience here, I'm hoping to get a bit of advice. I'm a rather young surveyor, late 20s (a baby in our field) and hope to one day run my own business, but as of right now I've run into the first job offer that I've actually considered. On paper it's seems much better including a large raise, better hours, and a quite frankly easier job. The problem is the job is for a lets say less than reputable firm. I care deeply about this profession and really want to leave a mark in some fashion be it in an association or just through excellence. I just wonder if my reputation would be tarnished by this, even if I'm able to turn the place around. There are a number of other issues, but my question is what have you guys done to evaluate a job offer?

A land without ruins is a land without memories - a land without memories is a land without history.

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Posted : May 18, 2017 7:07 pm
StLSurveyor
(@stlsurveyor)
500+ posts Registered

that1surveyor, post: 429025, member: 2169 wrote: I don't often post here, but do lurk often. I've found this to be a very valuable resource of knowledge in numerous subjects. With all the experience here, I'm hoping to get a bit of advice. I'm a rather young surveyor, late 20s (a baby in our field) and hope to one day run my own business, but as of right now I've run into the first job offer that I've actually considered. On paper it's seems much better including a large raise, better hours, and a quite frankly easier job. The problem is the job is for a lets say less than reputable firm. I care deeply about this profession and really want to leave a mark in some fashion be it in an association or just through excellence. I just wonder if my reputation would be tarnished by this, even if I'm able to turn the place around. There are a number of other issues, but my question is what have you guys done to evaluate a job offer?

We all want to run our own business. Me too. I've been thinking that for 15 years. Money isn't everything. If the firm has a bad rep stay away! Bad news travels fast - yes it will follow you. Talk to your boss, he/she was once like you, express your desires in the profession and your goals.

"Well that depends"

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Posted : May 18, 2017 7:23 pm
thebionicman
(@thebionicman)
1,000+ posts Registered

I spent a few years working for the worst Surveyor I've ever known. I wouldn't do it for a few dollars. It's not worth it.

CFedS, PLS ID-OR-WA-UT-NV

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Posted : May 18, 2017 7:29 pm
jim.cox
(@jimcox)
500+ posts Registered

Mud sticks

Coin is only a small part of job satisfaction

Having been stuck in an engineering firm I dont like to show on my cv, I would avoid them like the plague

=mjc=
.

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Posted : May 18, 2017 8:57 pm
Kent McMillan
(@kent-mcmillan)
10,000+ posts Registered

that1surveyor, post: 429025, member: 2169 wrote: I don't often post here, but do lurk often. I've found this to be a very valuable resource of knowledge in numerous subjects. With all the experience here, I'm hoping to get a bit of advice. I'm a rather young surveyor, late 20s (a baby in our field) and hope to one day run my own business, but as of right now I've run into the first job offer that I've actually considered.

The typical career path in the professions has at least three phases:

- apprenticeship,
- selling expertise, and
- elder statesman.

Apprenticeship - Gathering a broad range of experience to operationalize some background knowledge of the activity.
Selling Expertise - Putting the expertise acquired to work and being well paid for it.
Elder Statesman - Shaping the profession from the sum of one's experiences.

A surveyor in his twenties is in the apprenticeship phase of his career and should be focused upon gathering a broad range of experience that will form a basis for selling expertise later. Working for a Sad Sack firm with nothing other than a check to offer would not remotely qualify.

Best regards,
Kent McMillan, RPLS Austin TX

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Posted : May 18, 2017 9:24 pm
FrozenNorth
(@frozennorth)
250+ posts Registered

You'll earn less over the long run if you throw in with these guys. This can happen in lots of ways: You burn out with these guys and have to "start over" at a different firm. You miss out on the chance to build a portfolio of great clients, because, let's face it, the great clients don't hire bad firms for long. You bite the bullet and stick with this company a while, but end up stamping marginal stuff turned out by their low-level field crews, which in turn gets you in hot water with your peers and maybe even the licensing board. All kinds of stuff that equals stomach ulcers and less money in the medium to long term.

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Posted : May 18, 2017 9:29 pm
Michael White
(@michael-white)
20+ posts Registered

that1surveyor, post: 429025, member: 2169 wrote: I don't often post here, but do lurk often. I've found this to be a very valuable resource of knowledge in numerous subjects. With all the experience here, I'm hoping to get a bit of advice. I'm a rather young surveyor, late 20s (a baby in our field) and hope to one day run my own business, but as of right now I've run into the first job offer that I've actually considered. On paper it's seems much better including a large raise, better hours, and a quite frankly easier job. The problem is the job is for a lets say less than reputable firm. I care deeply about this profession and really want to leave a mark in some fashion be it in an association or just through excellence. I just wonder if my reputation would be tarnished by this, even if I'm able to turn the place around. There are a number of other issues, but my question is what have you guys done to evaluate a job offer?

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Posted : May 18, 2017 11:52 pm
Michael White
(@michael-white)
20+ posts Registered

Not really a tough call at all. You will gain their reputation by proxy. Unless you're buying in as a the owner or controlling partner, you won't change that company.

I've owned my on firm for almost 15 years now. Company reputation is everything.

Or you could just but me out. I'm selling and getting ready for retirement after 30+ years in the business.

If you're willing to work hard and keep your ethics high, surveying can be a very lucrative business.

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Posted : May 18, 2017 11:58 pm
Richard Imrie
(@richard-imrie)
500+ posts Registered

I've said this before on a previous similar thread: "Watch your back, nobody else will."

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Posted : May 19, 2017 1:04 am
James Fleming
(@james-fleming)
2,500+ posts Registered

I walked away from potential ownership in a firm because I didn't like the way they were cutting corners as the recession was coming on. You only have one reputation.

“Nothing grows old-fashioned so fast as modernity.”
― Robertson Davies

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Posted : May 19, 2017 3:23 am
StLSurveyor
(@stlsurveyor)
500+ posts Registered

Michael White, post: 429046, member: 12162 wrote: Not really a tough call at all. You will gain their reputation by proxy. Unless you're buying in as a the owner or controlling partner, you won't change that company.

I've owned my on firm for almost 15 years now. Company reputation is everything.

Or you could just but me out. I'm selling and getting ready for retirement after 30+ years in the business.

If you're willing to work hard and keep your ethics high, surveying can be a very lucrative business.

Selling, Getting ready for retirement....Maybe we need to talk...

"Well that depends"

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Posted : May 19, 2017 3:28 am
PA PLS
(@pa-pls)
20+ posts Registered

If you are looking to own your own firm one day, I would skip the less than reputable company. I am considering what I expect will be an offer from a company which involves a move about an hour and half away. For me it is about 8 years too late. I've been with the same company for 21 years and bought into the stories of how valued I was. Years went by, licenses were obtained and responsibilities grew yet the pay never changed for stretch of 11 years. I trusted the company would come around and things would change. I was wrong. If you have a goal keep working toward it. This will not be the last chance to advance your career if you pass on it if you don't let it. You just have to keep looking.

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Posted : May 19, 2017 4:39 am
holy cow
(@holy-cow)
10,000+ posts Registered

[USER=2169]@that1surveyor[/USER]

Hope you didn't get blown off the map last night.

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Posted : May 19, 2017 4:53 am
Brad Ott
(@brad-ott)
2,500+ posts Registered

Historically, my tolerance for working with a "bad" employer has been 3 to 6 months. Those events never made it to the resume.

Beer Leg dot com R O C K S ! !
If you find this forum valuable, then click here https://rplstoday.com/donate/

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Posted : May 19, 2017 6:21 am
Monte
(@monte)
500+ posts Registered

Kent McMillan, post: 429042, member: 3 wrote: The typical career path in the professions has at least three phases:

Kent, I may use this phrase in some of my discussions, if you don't mind.

If it ain't a mess, it'll do till the mess gets here...

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Posted : May 19, 2017 6:28 am
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