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Hi everyone, with the approval of a new robotic (the companies first one), there was the questions of how much does it get billed out as for the 1 man crew running it, or even two if it differs for you.  We are in Massachusetts and our rates for 2 man is around 165p/h.  Any insight would be great!

Also just joined after stalking the forums for a while, y;all are great.

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jamieinct
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We are in CT. All our instruments that we use are robotic. Our billing is around 135 per hour for 1 person or 200 per hour for two of us. Good luck

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Mark Mayer
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Posted by: jamieinct

We are in CT. All our instruments that we use are robotic. Our billing is around 135 per hour for 1 person or 200 per hour for two of us. Good luck

I have seen these rates in the Portland area. My own are about 10% lower.  But things have been rocket hot for the last couple of years. Those rates may be a little inflated for this area.  

The spread between 1-person and 2-person rates is dependent upon the quality of the persons. If the 2nd person is little more than a gopher for the 1st, the spread will be low. So I recommend a formulaic approach. Wages * multiplier plus a charge for equipment.  A typical multiplier is 3.0.  So if total hourly wages on crew come to $50/hr  - perhaps $35 for the top guy and $15 for the gopher - that's $150 for the 2-person and $105 for the 1-person. 

As for equipment charges, you might expect your equipment payback time on a robot to be 1 year. In that year your robot might be billable for 75% of  40 hrs per work. ie/Roughly 1500 hours in a year.  For a $30,000 robot that's $20/hr. 

So adding up we might have $125/hr for a 1-person crew rate and $170/hr for a 2-person. You should substitute your own numbers into this and see what you come up with.   

As I say the local market is hot. The multipliers being used right now are probably well over 3.0.  Back in 2010 the multipliers were well below that. 

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Love the theory Mark.  Everyone else this is awesome input.  I like the way mark thinks because in that equation I should be making much more than what im getting paid for what they charge >:)  but alas that is not my focus for right now.  I leaning twards charging a little extra on both ends, but i like the 1 man crew idea being about 80% of what the two man crew is, since 2 man crews are just usually more efficiant, thank you Jim.  The extra on both ends is simply having the better equipment to give better quality as well as making the work faster (Cameron),(&) youre right Flyin' we cant cut ourselves short.

I'll tell ya for the first topic I put up, I think im going to enjoy it here

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JKinAK
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Posted by: Mark Mayer

The spread between 1-person and 2-person rates is dependent upon the quality of the persons. If the 2nd person is little more than a gopher for the 1st, the spread will be low. So I recommend a formulaic approach. Wages * multiplier plus a charge for equipment.  A typical multiplier is 3.0.  So if total hourly wages on crew come to $50/hr  - perhaps $35 for the top guy and $15 for the gopher - that's $150 for the 2-person and $105 for the 1-person. 

As for equipment charges, you might expect your equipment payback time on a robot to be 1 year. In that year your robot might be billable for 75% of  40 hrs per work. ie/Roughly 1500 hours in a year.  For a $30,000 robot that's $20/hr. 

So adding up we might have $125/hr for a 1-person crew rate and $170/hr for a 2-person. You should substitute your own numbers into this and see what you come up with.   

As I say the local market is hot. The multipliers being used right now are probably well over 3.0.  Back in 2010 the multipliers were well below that. 

We follow this basic approach (our multiplier is north of the example) - instead of hourly charges for equipment we have a daily rate of $120 for each of the following pieces of equipment: digital level, GPS antenna, robotic total station. We have a higher rate for scanning total stations and other specialized equipment. We don't charge for controllers or the other $40k of equipment that we have in a crew rig. Simple pricing for equipment use makes it easier for us to track and clients to understand - we rarely have any jobs that are less than one day.

Our clients have never voiced any objections to these rates (although one did negotiate a slightly lower day rate on the equipment for a larger job - we felt their request was reasonable given the number of continuous days of use).

Invoices show individual hours (they don't see crew hours), labor rates, equipment charges, and other expenses.

 

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Jim Frame
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My 1-man crew rate is 80% of my 2-man rate.

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Brad Ott
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Me and my robot collect at least 200 p/h.

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flyin solo
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Why should it be any less? You’re ultimately providing more efficient service when all factors are considered. In the end your clients’ cumulative costs will be lower. So why double down on cutting yourself out of the equation?

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John Putnam
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Jim is correct, a one person crew should not cost quite as much as a two person crew.  The simple fact is one person is not as effective as two for certain tasks where a crew can split.  Searching for pins, setting control and dipping MHs comes to mind.  This is just from my 20+ years experience running robotics.

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